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Bicycle-Related Injuries Increasing in the U.S.

Adult bicycling injuries increased sharply between 1998 and 2013, according to a new study that also reveals the increase is largely among cyclists over age 45. Bicycling is a popular among people of all ages for sport or commuting, but a growing number of adults embrace cycling as a low-impact exercise. The survey comes from the National Electronic Injury Surveillance System, which collects data that includes bicycle-related injuries of those over age 18. Between 1998-1999, there were an estimated 96 bicycle-related injuries and about 5 hospital admissions per 100,000 people. Between 2012-2013, however, those numbers rose to 123 injuries and about 11 hospital admissions per 100,000 people. Researchers further examining the data discovered the correlation between injuries and age. In 1998, 23% of reported injuries were in riders over age 45. In 2012, this figure rose to 42% of injuries. Compared to younger individuals, older riders are more likely to be hurt in crashes or collisions. The study found that extremity injuries are less common, but head and torso injuries have risen. These findings demonstrate the importance of wearing appropriate safety gear as well as the need for U.S. cities and communities to support better bicycle riding infrastructures.

Author: ChiroPlanet.com
Source: 
JAMA, online September 1, 2015.